Take the GED Test Without Taking Classes: Here Is How


How Can I Take the GED Test Without Classes?

GED classes are intended to focus on the essential skills and information needed to pass each subject of the test.

They allow you to refresh your memory and knowledge of the topics you might have forgotten.

How can I take the GED test without classes? Take the GED test in states where GED preparation classes are not required. However, make sure that the state where you plan to take the exam does not require you to be a resident.

Check out the states that do not require applicants to take a GED prep course below.

Take the GED Test Where GED Preparation Classes Are Not Required

Not all states require test-takers to undergo GED preparation classes. But in some states, applicants are required to pass the GED Ready test.

This test is a tool to evaluate your current understanding of each subject involved in the GED.

If you are ready to take the exam even without taking a GED preparation class or GED Ready test, you can do so.

But first, make sure that the state where you will take the exam does not require taking a GED prep course.

Here are some of the states where you can take the GED test without taking a GED preparation course:

Alabama

GED candidates in Alabama are not mandated to take GED prep classes before taking the exam.

Also, test-takers are not required to take the GED Ready practice test to prove that they are eligible for the test.

On the other hand, underage learners, 16- and 17-year-olds, have to be residents of Alabama.

Applicants 18 and over do not need to be residents of the state.

Alaska

If you want to skip the GED preparation course or GED Ready test, Alaska is the best place for you to take the exam.

You don’t have to be a state resident to qualify, which is convenient if you don’t want to move out of your hometown.

Students who are officially withdrawn from high school and are aged 16 or 17 can also take the exam after submitting written consent from a guardian.

Arizona

This state does not require GED prep classes, but it requires test-takers to pass the Arizona Civics test to receive their Arizona High School Equivalency diploma.

Similar to Alaska, you don’t have to be a resident to take the GED. Underage test-takers are also required to submit additional documentation to be eligible for the exam.

Arkansas

Unlike other states, Arkansas might not require GED prep classes, but it requires examinees to take the GED Ready practice test.

You can take a practice test at a GED testing center or an official adult education center before getting a GED test schedule.

Aspiring test-takers who are 16 to 17 years old should also meet all exam requirements, including the GED Ready practice test.

California

In California, test-takers younger than 18 can qualify for the exam if they are within two months (60 days) of their 18th birthday.

The same is true if they are within 60 days of the day when they ought to graduate regularly from high school.

However, they can receive their California HS Equivalency Certificate only when they turn 18.

California offers three options for High School Equivalency testing: the HiSET, TASC, and GED.

Colorado

In Colorado, you don’t have to take a prep course or GED Ready practice test, or be a state resident to take the exam.

However, 16-year-old applicants should hold an official Age Waiver and be approved by a GED testing center.

Similar to California, test-takers in Colorado can also choose from the TASC, GED, or HiSET.

Connecticut

This state allows test-takers who don’t undergo a GED prep course or practice test.

But if you are not from this state, you can’t take the exam.

Test-takers who are 17 to 18 years old can qualify for the exam if they abide by strict regulations, as the minimum GED testing age is 19.

Delaware

State residency is a requirement in Delaware. While it allows 16-year-olds and above to take the exam, test-takers aged 16 and 17 should comply with strict requirements such as having parental consent and school district approval.

District of Columbia

In this state, you have to be a resident to take the exam and get a score of at least “Likely to Pass” or “Too Close to Call” on your GED Ready practice test.

Also, test-takers have to be 18 years or above.

Those who are 16 or 17 years old can qualify if they are officially withdrawn from school and have parental consent, among other requirements.

Florida

Test-takers who are 18 years old or above are not required to be residents of the state, nor do they have to take a GED prep course or the GED Ready test.

Meanwhile, underage applicants should hold an Underage Waiver from their school district and abide by strict requirements.

Idaho

Applicants who are 18 years old or above can pretty much take the GED test without undergoing a prep course or practice test in Idaho.

On the other hand, underage applicants should have parental consent and be officially withdrawn from school.

Illinois

Test-takers in Illinois should be residents for at least 30 days to take the exam.

There is no need for a prep course or GED Ready test, but applicants should be 17 years old or above.

Seventeen-year-old applicants should also bring an official withdrawal letter from the school they previously attended.

Additionally, you have to pass the U.S. & Illinois State Constitution exam at major testing sites or the Regional Office of Education. Illinois offers two High School Equivalency tests: the HiSET and the GED.

Kansas

In Kansas, to take the GED test, you don’t have to take the GED Ready practice test, be a state resident, or finish a GED prep course.

However, you should be at least 18 years old. Underage applicants must complete an official “Compulsory Attendance Exemption Form” or “Compulsory School Attendance” signed by a guardian or parent.

Kentucky

You don’t need to take a GED prep course in Kentucky, but you need to take the GED Ready practice test and be a state resident.

Test-takers should also be at least 19 years old, though applicants who are 18 years old may qualify if it has been 90 days or more since they officially withdrew from school.

Other States Not Requiring GED Preparation Classes

●    Maryland

●    Massachusetts

●    Michigan

●    Minnesota

●    Mississippi

●    Missouri

●    Montana

●    Nebraska

●    Nevada

●    New Hampshire

●    New Jersey

●    New Mexico

●    New York State

●    North Carolina

●    North Dakota

●    Ohio

●    Oklahoma

●    Oregon

●    Pennsylvania

●    Rhode Island

●    South Carolina

●    South Dakota

●    Tennessee

●    Texas

●    Utah

●    Vermont

●    Virginia

●    Washington

●    West Virginia

●    Wisconsin

●    Wyoming

●    American Samoa

●    Bermuda

●    Guam

●    North Mariana Islands

●    Virgin Islands

The states that are not mentioned, such as Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, and Louisiana, require test-takers to undergo a GED preparation course either for underage applicants or for those who meet the minimum age requirement.

Conclusion

Most states in the U.S. might not require test-takers to attend GED preparation classes or get the desired score on the GED Ready practice test; these are designed to help you get better in the subjects you are struggling with. On the other hand, take the exam if you are perfectly ready.

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